Tag Archives: power

One less Tory scum

Update 11 April – well, well, well…hundreds of people in Bristol came together on Monday 8 April, in and around the Chelsea & Plough pubs on Chelsea rd, Easton BS5 for a street party to celebrate Thatcher’s departure from this world. See Bristol Indymedia report and Bristolian report, also local Tory press report. An offer of help to anyone facing legal problems/arrest has been made by Bristol Defendant Solidarity, call 07746741104 and leave a message.

It may be 34 years late… Continue reading One less Tory scum

Resist Corporations’ attempts to muzzle dissent

Breaking news 13 March – seems EDF have F’D OFF and bottled the court action for damages. See ‘EDF in dramatic climbdown’.

Ever since the labour movement of the 1970’s posed the question of ‘power’ to the political elite & boss class, successive Thatcherite governments have sort to crush union power, or at least tie the unions up in legal knots and with financial threats. They have largely succeeded, and must be emboldened by the relatively weak response to the Coalition government’s politically motivated austerity measures resulting in job threats & losses, and pay freezes.

EDF poster_smallHowever whilst the potential power of organised labour has lain fairly dormant and unused, opposition to austerity and corporate domination has tended to come from community and activist campaigns, with some success. Whilst numerous laws, and the reality of arrest & prison, have been used to intimidate campaigns, they remain an ongoing thorn in the side of power of capital and the state, with the potential to go further. So no doubt with one eye on potential struggles ahead, we can expect new or not often used measures to be tried on by corporations and the state.

Continue reading Resist Corporations’ attempts to muzzle dissent

Horsemeat and bullshit for the masses

…tax cuts and maximised profits for the corporate chains
…and along the supply chain crap wages & working conditions for the workforce

You don’t have to be an anarchist to note that the ‘contaminated’ products are all based at the cheaper end of the market, mass produced products of dubious quality anyway, for the impoverished masses. Not much sign of products in posh shops and restaurantes requiring examination, wonder why?

deathcoThose supply chains, as exposed in the media, are long and complex – so many sub-contractors and middlemen, so much transportation, it’s amazing anyone makes any money at all. No doubt the workforce down that chain makes very little pay for very long hours. Supermarkets and the larger food producers use their economic power to force down supply prices, and therefore quality, as they attempt to dominate the markets and maximise their profits. Continue reading Horsemeat and bullshit for the masses

A 7 step guide to capitalism and beyond

For a while we’ve been looking for a relatively straightforwards guide to capitalist economics, and the present ongoing global crisis. As we’re not exactly professors of economics ourselves, we wanted something written in relatively plain language that we could dip into (or log onto) at our leisure. Well luckily we’ve come across exactly that, and we share it here for everyone else out there who is confused by the deliberately mystifying (and political) language of most economics books, articles and news reporting. What follows in the links below may not be ‘perfect’, but its more than a useful start – enjoy, pass it on, act.

Kaput – an anti-capitalist & anarchist project (and therefore free to share)

A seven step guide to capitalist economics, money & finance, the market state, the crisis, and what may come next. These articles (as links) are the written up notes of a series of workshops. At the end of each you will find a useful list of further reading, much online. Continue reading A 7 step guide to capitalism and beyond

Austerity is another word for war

In the run up to this years Bookfair we aim to post up a series of articles looking at the most important issues of our time: the ideological nature of the ruling elites attack on the working class (and those who will never work); the worsening economic recession; the inherent crisis of capital; resistance to these attacks; alternative economic ideas; and sources for further information. Our aim is to stimulate understanding of the issues, debate, and of course action.

We kick off with an article by Roy Ratcliffe from the critical-mass blog:

Austerity: Another Word For War
The article equates global austerity to a condition of large-scale ‘war’ by the upholders of the capitalist mode of production – against the rest of society. The article considers two possible lines of resistance and defence which could put ordinary people onto a self-reliant and defensive war footing.

1. The attack is already under way.
Globally, the troops have been prepared, the weapons sharpened, the strategic headquarters of capitalism have been readied, the national command centres have been briefed and the local field marshals are on the alert. In 2013 the previous heavy skirmishes conducted by the financial, economic and political agents of capital, will be intensified into a veritable war against the working classes and the poor.

As usual it’s the bondholders and banksters among the 1% plus who will order an increase in the intensity of the war against the rest of society. Their colleagues in the strategic, decentralised headquarters of IMF, World Bank, Central and national banks, along with their paid mercenaries in national governments and states are planning the tactics and strategy. Their field agents in local governments and law courts are on stand-by – ready to wield the life-threatening armaments – and do their bidding. (Read more…)
Continue reading Austerity is another word for war

From the squatter camps of South Africa

On November 6th: From the squatter camps & shanty towns of South Africa – a rare opportunity to hear first-hand from a black South African grassroots activist, about their daily struggles to sustain a basic existence in the face of state oppression and corporate greed.

Lindela Figlan is a prominent member of Abhlali baseMjondolo (AbM), the Shack Dwellers Movement, that originated largely in the shanty towns and squatter camps on the outskirts of Durban in South Africa around 2005, but is spreading further afield. AbM were invited to send a speaker over for the London Anarchist Bookfair on 27 October. Via a loose network of anarchist bookfair collectives & social centres, a whirlwind 20 day tour was put together, taking Lindela around the UK, and to Bristol on Tuesday 6th November.
Continue reading From the squatter camps of South Africa

Oppression, resistance, repression, and resistance

What goes around, comes around. When there is oppression, there is always resistance, and then there’s repression of the resistance. The key is to break the cycle, once and for all.

Unless you’ve been visiting another planet these last few weeks, you’ll be aware of the confrontations in and around Stokes Croft, spilling into the neighbourhoods on either side (see Bristol Indymedia for starters if you have been on Mars). There are numerous local contributory factors that have been discussed at length elsewhere, but what we are seeing, or at least beginning to see, is a classic re-enactment of an ages old power struggle – for control of the streets. It is not a game, it is deadly serious. Lives, liberty and peoples’ futures are at stake. It is not a power struggle the ruling class (that is, those who control the wealth and political system) dare lose, because if they lose once it could be game over for them. They will use every tool at their disposal to win this struggle, all the time, wherever it occurs across Bristol and Britain as a whole. They know if they lose the streets, they are on their way out.

Bloody Revolutions
If you doubt this then look at exactly the same power struggle playing out right now across north Africa and the Middle East/Arab region, and to an extent on the fringes of Europe (Greece for example). Clearly there the struggle is at a heightened level and far more generalised across each specific country, but it is the same struggle. You can see clearly the lengths the dictators and oppressive regimes there will go to in order to maintain power and control of the streets – sending in armed forces, killing people, throwing them into prison to face rape, torture and humilitation, and death. Continue reading Oppression, resistance, repression, and resistance

The root cause of our problems. Money.

The new financial year is kicking in, and with it all the new budget cuts and austerity measures forced upon us by the political class and their corporate masters. If you’ve already had your payslip for March, you’ll have seen your NI payments went up. As our wages/incomes devalue, down to 2005 levels already, things are going to get worse. Meanwhile inflation rises along with unemployment, whilst benefits and services are cut. Yet banks and other corporations hand out big fat bonuses and salary increases, and there’s plenty of spare cash for another war or two. So plenty of money and wealth around, its just not shared out equally. Those who hold it control power, and they won’t be giving it away, unless we take it. But what if there was no money, or we created a new world outside the capitalist system?

In a rare radical moment, last Saturday’s Guardian newspaper (run on capitalist lines of course), on the morning of the great protests in London, printed the following article by John Holloway. The author of ‘Crack Capitalism’ and a host of other books worth checking out, lobbed a serious challenge into the cuts debate:

Cracks in the rule of money

How do we escape a system that’s tearing up the world? We say ‘no’, and do things differently.

These are days of rage. Rage in the Arab world, of course, but also on the streets of Athens, Dublin, Rome, Paris, Madrid, and now a loud clamourous rage on the streets of London.

An age of crisis is an age of frustrated hopes, frustrated life. We want to go to university but it is too expensive. We need good healthcare, but we cannot pay for it. We need homes, and we can see homes standing empty, but they are not for us. Or, for the millions of people who are starving: we want to eat, we can see that there is plenty of food for everyone, but something stands between us and the food – money, or the lack of it. Continue reading The root cause of our problems. Money.

Diverse tactics stop NewLabour hijack of anti-cuts protest

Saturday 26 March saw a magnificent protest as at least half a million people marched, danced and took direct action in London against the ConDem Coalition’s austerity measures and cuts. Thousands of Bristolians attended, travelling down by coach, train and car, and some could be found in attendance at most of the range of protests that occurred across the capital from early in the morning until late at night.

diy on main march
diy on main march

Many thousands clearly put a lot of time and effort into their protest, with a stunning array of homemade placards, banners and imagery. Whilst there was virtually no pro-NewLabour propaganda, many made clear their rejection of not just the cuts, but the ConDem Coalition and indeed capitalism too.

NewLabour hijack thwarted
Despite the best efforts of the TUC and NewLabour leadership, NewLabour had a very bad day. The TUC had worked hard to keep even moderately radical voices off the Hyde Park rally platform, with the likes of RMT leader Bob Crow and Green MP Caroline Lucas not allowed to speak because of their non-support for NewLabour. Stupid NewLabour leader Ed Millibrand gave a poor and contradictory speech. Claiming to be a part of and proud of the anti-cuts campaigns, he proceeded to state clearly that NewLabour would in any case make cuts, just like the Coalition, and indeed just like the many NewLabour councils implementing cuts across the country. The idiot even claimed to be part of a history of protest that included the Suffragetes, Nelson Mandela/the ANC, and the black US civil rights campaign, but later condemend all and any forms of direct action that involved absolutely any sort of property damage or violence, thereby displaying his utter ignorance of the tactics used by the groups he mentioned – which included disrupting meetings, breaking windows, non-compliance, mass civil disobedience, occupations and of course the clandestine armed struggle of the ANC. He clearly forgot the Suffragettes window-smashing day of anger in Picadilly in 1913, and their physical attack on Winston Churchill at Bristol station! Continue reading Diverse tactics stop NewLabour hijack of anti-cuts protest

A critical look at the G20 London protests one year on

Well we nearly stormed one of them...
Well we nearly stormed one of them...

The article below is fairly short, sharp and to the point in its critique of last year’s G20 protests and the ‘movement’. It first appeared today on UK Indymedia, the author is unknown. However it articulates what some people, at least, are thinking, and is reposted here to generate discussion. (Images added by Bookfair person. For post-G20 info on arrests and Ian Tomlinson see the Bristol ABC blog).

You may disagree? Perhaps you were on the roof at Jesters No-Tesco squat, or out trashing other Tescos? A climate camp veteran perhaps? Or maybe you’ve come out as an anarchist-communist or class-struggle anarchist and just joined/set up a new group? Maybe from where you are standing the future looks bright and the revolution is just one more action away? In which case thats great, get stuck in, may the force be with you. If you’d like to disagree with this (unknown) author then send in your view.

The Summer of Rage? A critical look at the G20 London protests one year on (original article here)

Did anyone notice the summer of rage? Like all British summers, it was disappointingly non-existent: a few letters in the guardian, a climate camp of Cath Kidston tents and, to top it all, hardly a day of sun. Continue reading A critical look at the G20 London protests one year on